Your Complete Guide To The Women’s March On Washington

Womens March on WashingtonThis Saturday, over 200,000 people will take to the streets of Washington D.C. in solidarity with our fellow women and in protest of Donald Trump’s administrative threats on the female body (not to mention his own, personally exhaustive history of allegations of assault against women’s bodies).

The Women’s March on Washington is set to be one of the biggest demonstrations in the history of the United States, and will be uniting women and allies from across the nation. Whether you are going to the march, attending a local sister march, or stuck at home, we’ve got the complete detailed guide on what you need to know to be part of the Women’s March on Washington.

The Women’s March on Washington’s Raison d’etre

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The origin story of the March on Washington is as cool as it gets (well, given the circumstances). Legend has it that a grandmother in Hawaii invited 40 of her friends on Facebook to protest with her in the nation’s capital. Friends invited Facebook friends, who invited similarly minded Facebook friends, who invited similarly minded Facebook groups. Someone then posted about it in Pantsuit Nation, and $@*t got real.

However, despite the huge surge behind the march, it wasn’t without its controversies. First there was the issue of appropriation. Shortly following were issues of representation and intersectionality. Then there was the issue of issues – how did organizers feel about pro-life groups joining along? How do sex workers fit into this? Indeed, it was an intersectional time (and discussion) for American feminists.

But finally, the march landed on a set of intersectional, feminist principles that defined not only the Women’s March on Washington, but is also helping to push forward the conversation about modern feminism.

Before you go (or don’t go)….read this

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Regardless of whether you plan to go to the march (or not), the scholars over at Elle put together this amazing list of books to contextualize the Women’s March on Washington (and you should totally read it).

Why? This march is going to be big. Like really, REALLY big. Like, when your kids are reading about it someday in class, you can nonchalantly tell them, ‘Sweetie, I was there. ‘ But as Elle states, “the women’s march isn’t an academic exercise, it is an act of real politics, and much is at stake. These selections will help you prepare.”

RELATED: These Are The Female Activists You Need To Know About

These books give a comprehensive, intersectional perspective on the issues facing American women of all diverse backgrounds, as well as insight into Donald Trump and his impending administration.

Event Details 

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If you’re planning on going to the march, there are a few things you need to know. First things first, if you haven’t already done so, register here. This isn’t just for a headcount, it helps organizers, and officials know what to plan for (toilettes, security, etc).

Where: Independence Ave SW & 3rd St SW, Washington DC. 20002

When: Saturday, January 21 2017

Time: 10 a.m. – 5pm, (the rally site opens at 8:30 am on Saturday)

Where to Turn Up: Jackson Boulevard between Columbus Drive and Lake Shore Drive

Weather: Saturday looks like 55 and cloudy, so dress accordingly

March Map Route

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Marching Guide:  transportation and app

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Are you planning to march? Great! Download the app. This puppy is going to give you ready access to the details you will need to know on the day of, including up-to-date D.C. transit information, a schedule, list of speakers and performers, a chat forum, and news channel. You can also receive notifications on your phone, so you’re in the know.

If you’re not already located in D.C., you’ll need to find a way to get there. Check out one of these sites that offer transportation options:

Once you are in D.C., you won’t be allowed to drive up to the march or park (unless you are in need of handicap drop-off access, in which case, read here). Most likely, if you’re arriving on a bus, you’ll park far enough away that you won’t be able to walk to the rally site. Be prepared to purchase a metro card there (which should cost you around 10 dollars).

What to Bring

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Bring the basics: water and snacks for the day. There will be food onsite for purchase, so you’re welcome to bring cash or credit cards. However if you’re not a New Yorker and line averse, packing a lunch is always the way to go.

Toilette paper: there will be public bathrooms to use, but there are also going to be 200,000+ people on site. Which means there might not be toilette paper. If you’re not planning on using the facilities provided, plan to leave the march zone.

Other essentials:

  • Your ID (always an important)
  • A portable phone charger (you’ll be there all day)
  • Layers. layers. layers (not trying to mom you but, you just never know)

How to get involved if you can’t go

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Sister Marches
There are going to be 600 marches around the country. YES. 600 marches, this Saturday, everywhere.

They will not be slimly attended marches either. These sister marches are estimated to bring in as many as one million people. The largest U.S. sites are predicted to be in Chicago, L.A., Boston, San Fransisco, and Austin. But many more will be popping up around the country, so click here, type in your zip code, and join forces.

Live Stream Love
There are going to be a lot of people at the marches live streaming the event. You can following along using the following hashtags, or help spread the solidarity using the hashtag #WomensMarch#WhyIMarch and #IMarchFor.

Donate
If you can’t participate in any of the marches, but want to support the cause, consider donating. Its a tried and true way to help ensure the success of marches and keeps people safe.

Shanthi Blanchard

About Shanthi Blanchard

Shanthi is a writer and consultant based in New York City. As a digital and brand strategist, Shanthi works for women entrepreneurs and rural businesses on a mission to improve the world. She is also a passionate political writer, sports enthusiast, and runner. Follow her in twitter and Instagram @Oms4Shanthi. Pitch Shanthi: shanthi@heragenda.com
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